JEWELRY AND MEN

JEWELRY AND MEN

Men's jewelry has not always been taboo. History shows that men have always been very fond of ornaments and adornments, sometimes even more demonstrative than women.

Everywhere and for a long time, from Antiquity to the Renaissance, through the Middle Ages, men wore jewelry - sometimes very showy - to assert their social status among their peers.
In ancient Egypt, all men wore jewelry. The humblest were content with small amulets, while the richest wore voluminous ornaments on their chests, rings (sometimes several on each finger), or cuffs made of gold and various gems (turquoise from Sinai, lapis lazuli from Afghanistan).

The Romans, less extravagant, however, used to wear rings, bibs and precious necklaces. Some jewels could signify a military affiliation.

From the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, each period was marked by a particular practice of ornament, both for men and women. The Byzantine influence had the effect of popularizing the most sumptuous ornaments for those who could afford them. However, it was customary to wear the jewels on the clothes rather than on oneself. This period saw the democratization of the clasp, also called fermail, a kind of brooch used to hold the two sides of the cape or coat.